Last but not least

Please visit my new website: to see art, my blog and SHOP!  fullsizeoutput_4a2a.jpegThanks for following me and I look forward to seeing you at my new site!


Back to pincushion production with one more show to go!

2017popupartA BIG THANK YOU to everyone who stopped and shopped at my booth yesterday at the Laurelhurst Winter Bazaar. Great energy, crowds and more at this PTA-sponsored event. I almost sold out of all my items: pincushions, potholders and polar bears.

Laurelhurst2017 After a brief respite this morning, a jaunt across the Columbia with two of my gal pals to the Pendelton Outlet Store in Washougal, I’m back at work. And yes, I’m now the happy owner of a cozy, classic Pendelton blanket.

blanketPincushion production restarts NOW for this Saturday’s December Pop Up Shop. Check out what just arrived 5 minutes ago via US Mail from Renaissance Ribbons. Aren’t they fabulous? Looking forward to stitching them into new colorful pincushions.

newribbonsHope to see you Saturday! Additionally, I will have more information about my Stitching classes, which will begin in January.


December Pop-up Shop & more

It’s crazy busy here in PDX what with the upcoming (and just finished) holidays, parties, family gatherings and (most important to me at the moment) SHOWS. Four to go and then I’m finished. Whew.23172754_1580780921960699_5600731712206462794_nBe-ribboned wool felt PINCUSHIONS (they are featured on the poster), POTHOLDERS stitched from repurposed felted wool sweaters and POLAR BEAR ORNAMENTS (10% of each ornament sales goes to Polar Bear International 

2017popupartOur 4th Year! Drop by and meet our new artists, Diane and Virginia. Shop Local!

23722223_10155533927738110_2848966384253473669_nI will have 10 encaustic photo collages in the BIG 500 – all artwork is 8 x 8 inches, ready to hang and only $40!

23659311_1657659184279202_7323035400940186670_nOpening December 16 at 2pm runs through December 28 / Pioneer Place / 700 SW 5th / Portland / Next to BIG 500 / MAJOR Deals to be had at this show – I’ll be selling older encaustic collage artworks along with some stitched and embroidered  fabric collages (at a huge discount), knitting yarn & more treasures from my studio. There will be something for everyone on your list!



I’m an artist / maker

fallshow2cardFall has always been my favorite season – the crisp air, fallen leaves crunching underfoot, the incredibly blue sky, the promise of new beginnings (linked I suppose, to the start of school for so many years).IMG_3871Now, however, it’s my busiest time – shows abound and I’m in the studio 8 hours+ on a daily basis. I’m whining (sort of) and I love it as well. I am an artist / maker and creating gets me going. IMG_3870Stitching, collage, photography, encaustic – all fulfill my need to MAKE.IMG_3865Visit me during Portland Open Studios – I’m #64 / Community 6 in NE Portland. You’ll have the opportunity to work with beeswax and make your own small encaustic collage AND see my newest artwork. I look forward to sharing the joys of art making with you!



Thinking about home

“Home wasn’t a set house, or a singe town on a map. It was wherever the people who loved you were, whenever you were together. Not a place, but a moment, and then another, building on each other like bricks to create a solid shelter that you take with you for your entire life, wherever you may go.”
– Sarah Dessen –
I’m sure, as children, many of us drew simple pictures of houses with happy families standing out front. My drawings were always comprised of houses with windows you could look in – and on the wall would be a picture of a house with windows that you could look in and see a picture of a house and a window . . . and on and on. I didn’t draw a happy family as my father had died when I was 10 and it made me too sad to draw only the three of us: my mom, little brother and me. But the house figured prominently in pictures and was very important to me.
The house form – a square or rectangle topped with a triangle has continued to captivate. I photograph abandoned houses (and wonder about their stories) and have recently begun collecting ceramic, glass and metal houses created by artists whose work I’d admire. Quotations are another aspect that is often included in my art work and I’ve been researching what others say and have written about home.
Using this iconic shape allows me the opportunity to further explore what “home” and “house” evokes in me and the people who view my artwork. My encaustic photo collages are created with beeswax, Demar resin, colored encaustic medium, pan pastels and oil pastels to create one-of-a kind artworks. These photo collages, inkjet printed on archival card stock and Japanese rice paper utilize my iPhone photos and often incorporate text, machine stitching, colored pencil marks and rubber stamp images. 
create visual stories about a time, memory or place – real or imagined and look forward to sharing my work with you via the pdx-csa (Portland Open Studios Community Supported Art) project. I am partnered with Samyak Yamauchi . Go to to find out more. 
“In life, a person will come and go from any homes. We may leave a house, a town, a room, but that does not mean those places leave us. Once entered, we never entirely depart from the homes we made for ourselves in the world. They follow us, like shadows, until we come upon them again, waiting for us in the mist.”
– Ari Berk –

When does your year begin?


Last summer, in Paris I secretly photographed this gentleman and his faithful companion, waiting patiently in line at a boulangerie. Wonder what a day is like for them and does one season melt into the next? Does their year begin after the Summer Soldes?


When does your year begin? September is often a marker for many of us. The first day of school: new clothes, new supplies, new friends and new experiences. January is a logical starting point as well. My August birthday has always been my “beginning.” And while celebrating my birthday always brings up many emotions, mostly positive (I’m starting another trip around the sun!) and a few negative (my dad, Merrill May died four days before my 11th birthday (quite some time ago – obviously – but still the memory is bittersweet), I use this yearly marker to assess where I’ve been and where I’m going.

Art wise I’m becoming more confident in my processes and mediums – encaustics are more or less turning out as I envision them – working with hot wax, while still challenging, is more predictable.



Cold wax, not so much. Learning to mix oil paints and create abstract interpretations of my inner visions is still a struggle. Work is often put aside until I can figure out where it needs to go, as in the piece below, “In the Distance.” Can’t begin to tell you how many variations this work went through (or how many layers of wax and paint exist under the topmost one). It’s like an archeological dig – scrape the surface and surprises await!


When not in the studio, the rest of my life continues on a pretty even keel. I travel, eat great meals and share good times with family and friends. At a recent event I took many photographs of these lovely koi – gracefully swimming under and around lily pads. I love how they shared their beauty and were unaware of what was above them or where their lives were going. Totally blissful.



This wall exists here in Portland and I love textures and peeling paint. It’s old and still hanging in there. Nuff said.

Is it done yet?

IMG_1765Working with cold wax and oil paint is challenging me daily. As someone who likes getting stuff completed in a timely fashion, oil paint demands that I play by its “slow down” rules. When I put paint to board, layer upon layer, I have to wait for stuff to dry and patience has never been my strong suit. Until recently I’d had no experience with this medium and it sucked me in just like hot wax (encaustic). Damn (and thank you to) those bees! This piece was started in early March. The birch panel was first covered with gesso and then a layer of Venetian plaster was laid down. The size alone was intimidating – it’s the biggest board I’ve used to date (18 x 28 inches). Using colors generally not in my color palette made me uncomfortable but I wanted to push myself. Subsequently, I was overwhelmed and put it aside for a month.

In April it went back on the easel and I attacked the surface with more paint, cold wax and lots of scraping and scratching. I kinda thought it was done, but wasn’t crazy about the result, so back in the closet it went.IMG_1782

Upon my return the East Coast (and the 11th International Encaustic Convention) I felt renewed and wanted to see what I could now do to this large panel. More layers and mark-making, a new color-way and finally a sense where this work is headed. And, while not done yet, the end is near (or so I think).IMG_2652

Another work that I thought was “done” and it wasn’t . . . IMG_1785

Thought it was done again but wait . . . IMG_1973

Now I think so.IMG_2645